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World Chimpanzee Day

World Chimpanzee Day takes place each year on 14 July.

Observed worldwide, the dedicated day provides a unique opportunity to celebrate the Jane Goodall Institute’s flagship species!

Why World Chimpanzee Day?

Through the groundbreaking research of Dr. Jane Goodall and the scientists who followed her, we now know so much more about the many behaviours, traits, and ecologies that make chimpanzees unique. Dr. Goodall was one of the first to share her observations that chimpanzees make and use tools, have a complex communication system and social structures, and can be altruistic. The more we learn, the more we realise how important it is to celebrate our connection to these complex and intelligent beings.

Why do chimpanzees need our support?

Chimpanzees are our closest living relatives, who share 98.6 per cent of our DNA.

However, chimpanzee populations have declined drastically over the last hundred years. There were once an estimated 1-2 million chimpanzees across twenty-five countries in Africa. Today, there are as few as 340,000 wild chimpanzees across the continent and are listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species

How does JGI help?

JGI is working hard to do our part in turning these numbers around. Together, by providing holistic solutions to end habitat loss, illegal wildlife crime, and disease transmission, we can give chimpanzees a fighting chance.

Although we celebrate chimpanzees on this special date, we campaign for their protection year-round. Visit ForeverWild to learn about how we are fighting the illegal wildlife trade.

Follow World Chimpanzee Day on Facebook.

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